August 2009

Fact: 86 % of the girls polled said they could chat online without their parents' knowledge, 57% could read their parents email, and 54% could conduct a cyber relationship (Girl Scout Research Institute 2002)


Tip:  Parents need to discuss internet safety with their children, indicating possible hazards. 


June 2009

Fact:  Identity theft occurs when someone uses your personal information such as your name, Social Security number, credit card number or other identifying information, without your permission, to commit fraud or other crimes.(consumerreporting.org)   


Tip:  Don't give out any financial information, such as checking account and credit card numbers; and especially your social Security number; on the phone or online, unless you initiate the call and know the person or organization you're dealing with. Don't give that information to any stranger. In general, it is only required for medical providers, banks, mortgages and credit card companies. (consumerreporting.org)

May 2009


Fact:   Many crimes that are committed in the real world also occur on the Net. These include fraud and embezzlement, harassment, "stealing" an identity, or stalking. A lot of information is available about you on the Net, and an enterprising criminal can find out a lot about you and use this information to his/her disadvantage. A criminal could use basic information about you (discovered on the Net), and then engage in "social engineering"--contacting your friends, co-workers, relatives, etc.--to learn even more.(Cyberstalking and Internet Safety FAQ by Rachel R. Hartman)

Tip:  Be VERY careful to whom you give personal information and where you post information. Use a "nonsense" password that has no relation to you as a person; use a combination of numbers, symbols, and letters and make sure it is at least 6 characters long. Change your password frequently and NEVER give it out. Try not to keep it written down. Avoid using the same password for multiple accounts.(Cyberstalking and Internet Safety FAQ by Rachel R. Hartman)


April 2009

Fact:  Four percent of children received aggressive solicitations from adults who attempted to meet the children in person, compared to 3 percent in 2000. (Love to Know website:  2007 Internet Safety Statistics for Children)

Tip:  Discuss Internet safety with your children, starting when they are very young so they learn how to identify predators and cyberbullies.

March 2009

Fact:  Nearly half of teens (47%) aren't worried about others us ing their personal info in ways they don't want (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet Safety Survey Wave II, " March 2007).

Tip:  Think about keeping some control over the information you post. Consider restricting access to your page to a select group of people, for example, your firends from school, your club, your team, your community groups, or your family.

February 2009

Fact:  23% of children have had an encounter with a stranger on the Internet, including 7% of children who reported having met someone in the real world from the Internet. (Harris Interactive, "Kids Outsmart Parents When it comes to the Internet," August 2007)

Tip:  Be wary if a new online friend wants to meet you in person.  Before you decide to meet someone, do your research:  Ask whether any of your friends know the person, and see what background you can dig up through online search engines.  If you decide to meet them, be smart about it:  Meet in a public place, during the day, with friends you trust. Tell an adult or a responsible sibling where you're going, and when you expect to be back. 

January 2009

Fact:  69% of teens regularly receive personal messages online from people they don't know and most of them don't tell a trusted adult about it (Teen Research Unlimited, "Cox Communications Teen Internet saftety Survey Wave It," March 2007)

Tip:  Flirting with strangers online could have serious consequences.  Because some people lie about who they really are, you never know who you are dealing with.

December 2008

Fact:  64% of teens post photos or videos of themselves online, while mroe than half (58%) post info about where they live.  Females are far more likely than male teens to post personal photos or videos of themselves (70% vs. 58%) (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet Safety Wave II." March 2007)

Tip:  Consider not posting your photo.  It can be altered and broadcast in ways you may not be happy about.  If you do post one, ask yourself whether it's one your mom would display in the living room.

November  2008

Fact:  About half (49%) are unconcerned that posting personal info online might negatively affect their future (Teen Research Unlimited.  "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II, " March 2007)


Tip:  Post only information that you are comfortable with others seeing -- and knowing -- about you.  Many people can see your page, including your parents, your teachers, the police, the college you might want to apply to next year, or the job you might want to apply for in five years.

October  2008


F act:   A mong teens active in social networking sites (like MySpace,Facebook), 61% post the name of their city or town, 49% post their school's name, 29% post their email address, and 29% post their last name (Lenhart, Amanda and Maddox, Mary. "Teens, Privacy, and Online Social Networks - How Teens Manage their Online Identities and Personal Information in the Age of MySpace." April 18, 2007)


Tip:   M ake sure your screen name doesn't say too much about you.  Don't use your name, your age, or your hometown.  Even if you think your screen name makes you anonymous, it doesn't take a genius to combine clues to figure out who you are and where you can be found.


September 2009

Fact:  Four percent of children received aggressive solicitations from adults who attempted to meet the children in person, compared to 3 percent in 2000. (Love to Know website:  2007 Internet Safety Statistics for Children)

Tip:  Discuss Internet safety with your children, starting when they are very young so they learn how to identify predators and cyberbullies.



 

 

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